I wish I spoke chicken.

I wish I spoke chicken. These three -- Jellybean (boy), Beatrice (Boy), and Sally (girl) -- are buddies. They hang out together all the time and seem to be at the bottom of the pecking order. They wait for everybody else to go outside and then jump down to gobble up food. It's interesting to see a hen who hangs out with two roos, and they seem to leave her alone. (She lays, so it's not like she's not fertile.) As far as roosters go, they pretty good boys. 
I've put them in the barn with Charlie (who is still mostly featherless on her back and who gets harassed by Red) and Iris (who's in there as company for Charlie). Even bedraggled Charlie is higher in the pecking order than these guys, so I'm hoping it'll be a peaceful mix. Charlie has shown *some* progress with her feather growth, so I'm hoping she'll return to normal eventually and will be able to re-join the rest of the flock.

I wish I spoke chicken. These three — Jellybean (boy), Beatrice (Boy), and Sally (girl) — are buddies. They hang out together all the time and seem to be at the bottom of the pecking order. They wait for everybody else to go outside and then jump down to gobble up food. It’s interesting to see a hen who hangs out with two roos, and they seem to leave her alone. (She lays, so it’s not like she’s not fertile.) As far as roosters go, they pretty good boys.
I’ve put them in the barn with Charlie (who is still mostly featherless on her back and who gets harassed by Red) and Iris (who’s in there as company for Charlie). Even bedraggled Charlie is higher in the pecking order than these guys, so I’m hoping it’ll be a peaceful mix. Charlie has shown *some* progress with her feather growth, so I’m hoping she’ll return to normal eventually and will be able to re-join the rest of the flock. #twelve22org

6 thoughts on “I wish I spoke chicken.

  1. Well, this isn’t chicken related, but it is animal-related. I remember you were looking for book suggestions a while ago. I went to visit friends in England this past spring, and the pound plummeted while i was there, so i took myself to a bookstore and bought some children’s books. One of them was “the lion inside”. I thought you might enjoy it. I was confirming the title and found this handy little website too: http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/library/books/the-lion-inside

  2. Hi Anna, I’ve been away from blogging for a bit but found my way back,, the problem you’re having with your chickens is the same thing my daughter went through with hers this past while,, time seemed to be the answer but it is amazing how the chickens group up and can be such bullies!!! She actually had to sew little aprons to protect the hens from injuries from the darn roosters,, my daughter has a hate hate relationship with the rooster lol it used to be love hate but is now hate hate,, He has become so very aggressive but she down deep still cares for him I’m sure.. the hens are such pets,,, but her two turkeys are even more like puppies, following everywhere, so gentle ,, they are huge but are pets , its funny because when the gas man delivers the gas he always says the same thing ” when are you going to cook up those turkeys,,always the same answer, never, they are pets,,lovely pets.I’m so glad you are doing well and your girls are beautiful!!Happy Thanksgiving,,

    1. Nice to hear from you, Laurie! I tried the apron for Charlie for many months, and then I started to wonder if it was part of the problem with her feathers not coming back in. That’s why she’s been “quarantined” for a while now, so she can be safe without the apron and not worry about Red. She and Iris and the two younger roosters are now living in the barn together, seemingly quite happily — the hens are too senior to the young roos for them to even think of hassling the hens. Red is a good leader for the rest of the flock, luckily!

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